Iaido-Kata

Seitei-Iai010203040506070809101112

Grundschule

We learn Seitei-Kata as basic forms (Kihon) inspired by the rules of the ZNKR (Zen Nihon Kendo Renmei). The following description of the kata includes some questions for critical checking of your forms (to come soon). This sub­serves for own practice and for iaido dan examination.
The first 10 katas are shown in the film, the last two forms are added after the recordings were made.

Note: only practice Iaido Kata under the guidance of an experienced Iaido trainer (don’t try this at home)!

Ipponme, Mae

(Mae: forward, to the front). In the first kata, the swordsman is sitting in a formal kneeling/sitting posture called Seiza. Sensing danger from an opposing individual seated in front of him, the swordsman acts (if possible in Sen sen no sen technique = by feeling ›Sen‹ initiatively and the attack is preemptive immediately before the attack by the enemy ) with a horizontal strike to the head (through Komekami, the cheek bone, also the eyeline) of his attacker; then, after moving sliding on the knees forward, followed by a lethal overhead cut.

Nihonme, Ushiro

(Ushiro: rear). WIn the second kata, the swordsman is seated in the formal seiza position. He senses an attack from an opposing individual from behind. The swordsman acts by simultaneously drawing his sword and rotating 180°, the swordsman acts with a horizontal strike to the head of his attacker; then, after moving forward, followed by a lethal overhead cut.

Sanbonme, Ukenagashi

(Uke-nagashi: deflection of opponent). In the third kata, the swordsman, while rising to his feet, blocks an enemy’s attack in Sen no Sen manner to the head from above, thus having the enemy’s blade slide harmlessly to one side. Meanwhile, he turns to the side out of the attackers line (Enbusen) to avoid the strike and get a good position (Seichusen) to counter­attack, too (concept of Enbusen/Seichusen.)
The swords­man quickly responds with an overhead diagonal cut, to finish his attacker. Before Noto the Mono-uchi part of the blade (last third) rests on the left knee for Chinugui.

Yonhonme, Tsukaate

(Tsuka-ate: strike with the handle of the sword). In the fourth kata, the swords­man is seated in a posture which allows his right knee to be raised off the ground. This seated posture, called Iai-Hiza, was common for swordsmen who wore full armor, to facilitate standing. The swordsman in this situation is confronted with two attackers, one in front and one in back. Using the butt-end of his sword’s hilt (Tsuka Kashira), the swordsman delivers a temporarily disabling strike to the solar plexus of the attacker in front. He quickly rotates 90° to dispose of his rear attacker with a horizontal thrust of his sword (Tsuki), followed by a frontal pivot, to deliver the mortal overhead strike to his original stunned opponent in front.

Gohonme, Kesagiri

(Kesa-giri: cutting through kesa). In the fifth form, the Iaidoka is in the position Tachi-Iai (Iai standing). The enemy attacks head-on with his sword raised. He wants to strike a straight line. The attacked person takes the initiative and walks into the opponent with an upward, diagonal cut along the Kesa (leads over the area of ​​the kesa garment, means belly). The one-handed cut goes from bottom left to top right. Immediately the blade is turned upwards and a two-handed cut is made along the same path down to the left.

Ropponme, Morotetsuki

(Moro-te-tsuki: two-handed engraving). Now you defend yourself against an attack against two or three opponents, two of them attacking frontally and one attacking backwards. The Iaidoka first performs a one-handed oblique stroke on the face of the frontal opponent (note concept of Enbusen / Seichusen) and immediately continues the action with a two-handed stab in the center of the opponent. He turns 180° left around backwards and attacks the rear attacker with an overhead cut. Immediately afterwards the Iaidoka turns back to the starting direction and ends the argument with another overhead cut. It can be the first opponent, or another third, previously hidden opponent.

Nanhonme, Sanpogiri

(San-po-giri: 33-way cut). The Iaidoka sees three opponents who threaten him and come towards him. You want to attack him. The frontal enemy is attacked and threatened with Ki. Then there is an evasive (surprising) turn to the right. The right opponent is defeated with a one-handed diagonal swipe to the head, collarbone, or raised forearms of an attacking enemy next the left opponent is defeated with both hands in the middle and then the middle opponent with a frontal cut. Finally with Hidari-Jodan-no Kamae and in Zanshin resign (like in every kata).

Happonme, Ganmenate

(Gan-men-ate: punch in the face). The swordsman is attacked by two people. One approaches from the front and the other from behind. The moment the aggressiveness is noticed, the Iaidoka acts by striking the attacker in the face with the hard end of his sword hilt (Tsukaate) before he can use his sword. With a left turn of 180° he pushes the tip of the drawn sword into the center of the rear attacker (belly, breast) onehanded. After a further turn back, the initially stunned frontal opponent is defeated with a two-handed overhead cut.

Kyuhonme, Soetezuki

(Soe-te-zuki: Hand guided stitch). While walking, the Iaidoka is attacked by an enemy from the left. Either he grabs the sword to steal it or he makes his own to attack. The aggression is countered in a flowing left ¼ turn with a deep diagonal Kesagiri cut from top left to right bottom. This is followed by a final stab into the center of the opponent (with guiding hand).

Jyupponme, Shihogiri

(Shi-ho-giri: 4-direction cut). You approach four opponents who surround you. In the moment of tension, you get ahead of the attackers. The attacker drawing his sword from diagonally right is slowed down with a blow of the handle on the hand, the opponent at the back left with (Sen) Sen no Sen and stab in the center. A turn to the first opponent with a vertical follows, then the opponent on the right rear and finally the opponent on the front left, after a short threat with right-hand Wakikamae, are defeated. Finally, Hidari-Jodan-no Kamae and Zanshin resign.

Jyu-ipponme, Soogiri

(Soo-giri: all cuts). While walking, the Iaidoka approaches an opponent. Foreseeing the attack, he draws the sword in Ukenagashi defenses. Immediately afterwards he counter-cuts and in Okuri-Ashi advancing the opponent on the right with a cut from the temple to the chin, then on the left with a cut from the shoulder to the center, then again on the right from the forearm to the center, then with a horizontal cut from the left to the center right through the belly and finally a vertical overhead cut ends the whole attack.

Jyu-Nihonme, Nukiuchi

(Nuki-uchi: pulling and hitting). An attacker stands directly in front of the Iaidoka. If the opponent suddenly uses the weapon, the defender pulls his sword overhead towards (maybe with Ukenagashi defense) and takes a step back at the same time to be on the safe side. This is followed by a final cut and a step forward together. A step backwards while chiburi out of the danger zone ends the form.

Omori Ryu010203040506070809101112

First stage Muso Shinden Ryu

The twelve forms of Omori Ryu represent the first level of learning in Muso Shinden Ryu. In this circle there are a total of 3 sub-schools with different objectives. All forms of Omori-Ryu except for one start from the Seiza, the Japanese knee seat. Sitting down, cutting and other details differ from the Seitei-Iai forms. The Kata 3rd Uto and 4th Atarito are not shown in the film. You can follow up on in this post .

Note: only practice Iaido kata under the guidance of an experienced Iaido trainer (don’t try this at home)!

Shohatto

(Shohat-to: beginning sword). In the first form, the Iaidoka sits in Seiza. When he detects a threat from someone sitting in front of him, action is taken.
He makes a one-handed horizontal cut to the attacker’s head and advances with ki. This attack is followed by a vertical two-handed cut that ends the kata.

Sato

(Sa-to: left sword). Again the Iaidoka is sitting in Seiza. If he detects a threat from someone sitting or coming to his left, action is taken. He turns left, makes a one-handed horizontal cut to the attacker’s head and advances threateningly.
This attack is followed by a vertical two-handed cut that brings the matter to an end.

Uto

(U-to: right sword). Again the Iaidoka is sitting in Seiza. If he detects a threat from someone sitting or coming to his right, action is taken. He turns to the right, makes a one-handed horizontal cut to the attacker’s head and advances threateningly.
This attack is followed by a vertical two-handed cut that brings the matter to an end.

Atarito

(Atari-to: striking sword). The Iaidoka kneels in the formal Japanese knee seat, the Seiza. He is turned away from the enemy who is right behind him. He senses the beginning of an attack. The Iaidoka reacts by turning 180° to the left and at the same time pulling the sword. He distributes a horizontal cut in the attacker’s face, advances urgently and pulls out a final two-handed cut (compare to Shohatto).

Inyoshintai

(In-yo-shintai: Yin-Yang, back and forth). In the fifth form, the enemy seated in front starts to move. He is attacked with a one-handed horizontal cut. The enemy flees and the Iaidoka stands up and defeats them with a straight cut. He goes after the falling opponent does Chiburi and Noto and waits in Tate-Hiza (crouching position).
A second enemy is coming. Action starts at the right moment. The Iaidoka evades backwards with a lunge and makes a one-handed horizontal cut to the attacker’s stomach and then advances. This attack is followed by a vertical two-handed cut that brings the matter to an end.

Ryuto

(Ryu-to: flowing sword). Now you defend yourself against an attack by an opponent coming from the left. The Iaidoka jumps forward from his knee seat. He draws his sword in flowing motion and fends off the opponent’s blow with the back of the blade (compare with Ukenagashi). He turns on the spot and cuts the opponent sideways at Do height, either flat or slightly diagonally.

Junto

(Jun-to: sword series). In this form the Iaidoka sits opposite another seated person in the Seiza. He assists a samurai who wants to practice Seppuku. He takes the Tanto (Japanese knife) in front of him. At this moment the Iaidoka takes up the sword, draws it and stands waiting in readiness.
The samurai cuts his belly or want to and leans forward. At that moment the Iaidoka strikes to shorten the suffering. The final movements simulate the following ritual cleansing of the sword (Shinto) with final stabbing.

Gyakutto

(Gyakut-to: twisted sword). Again the Iaidoka is sitting in the Seiza. When he detects a threat from someone coming from the front, action is taken. He fakes a pull but moves back and gets up. He pulls the sword to the Ukenagashi defense. This is followed by a short cut to Men (Menuchi) and a threatening advance (Seme). This attack is followed by a vertical two-handed cut.
After several kamae phases, the Iaidoka bends over the dying opponent, turns the sword and gives a coup de grace.

Seichuto

(Seichu-to: strong sword in the middle). Again the Iaidoka is sitting in the Seiza. If he detects a threat from someone sitting or coming to his right, action is taken. He turns to the right, paying attention to Seichusen, makes a one-handed oblique cut to the attacker’s head, underarms, or Do (as in Morotetsuki) and advances threateningly (Seme).
Then the thing is completed with a vertical cut.

Koranto

(Koran-to: Great strength of the tiger). The Iaidoka stands and pulls forward with a left step and a horizontal cut. He anticipates an opponent who is also attacking while standing. With the great strength of the tiger he pushes on Enbusen, breaking the attack of the enemy.
He advances threateningly in the middle and defeats the enemy with a two-handed vertical cut.

Inyoshintai Kaewaza

(In-yo-shintai Kae-waza: Yin-Yang, alternating technique). In the fifth form, the enemy seated in front attacks. He is attacked with a one-handed horizontal cut. The enemy flees and the Iaidoka stands up and defeats them with a straight cut. He follows the falling enemy and crouches down.
The opponent draws the sword again. He wants to hit the Iaidoka’s shin. The Iaidoka evades backwards with a lunge and performs a one-handed defensive movement with a twisted sword to ward off the attacker and then advances. This attack is followed by a vertical two-handed cut that brings the matter to an end.

Nukiuchi

(Nuki-uchi: pulling and hitting). Two swordsmen sit across from each other. The opponent moves, maybe is . The Iaidoka draws his sword in flowing motion and briefly places it on his sternum. Then he strikes up for a vertical cut. When cutting, the legs are spread apart to compensate.

Hasegawa Eishin Ryu01020304050607080910

Intermediate level Muso Shinden Ryu

The ten forms of Hasegawa Eishin Ryu represent the intermediate learning level of Muso Shinden Ryu. All forms except for Nukiuchi start from Iaihiza. Starting from the Japanese knee seat (Seiza) the right leg is set up. The hands are placed with the palms facing up.

Notes: Only perform this Katas with sufficient balance, body and leg strength. Only practice Iaido Kata under the guidance of an experienced Iaido trainer (don’t try this at home)!

Yokugumo

(Yoku-gumo:: Seitliche Wolke. In der ersten Form sitzt der Iaidoka im Iaihiza. Wenn er eine Be­dro­hung erkennt, die von einem ihm Gegen­über­sit­zen­den ausgeht, kommt es zur Aktion.

Er weicht mit einem Ausfallschritt nach hinten aus (Variante: Ziehen nach vorne) und führt einen einhändigen waage­rech­ten Schnitt zum Kopf des Angreifers. Diese Attacke wird von einem senkrechten beidhändigen Schnitt gefolgt, der die Sache zuende bringt. Diese Attacke wird von einem senkrechten beid­händigen Schnitt gefolgt, der die Form beendet.

Toraisoku

(Tora-isoku: (Tigerpranke). Wieder sitzt der Iaidoka im Iaihiza. Ein Angreifer zieht das Schwert zum Bein des Sitzenden. Im Kontern weicht der Iaidoka zurück und zieht sein Schwert. Der Griff wird leicht von oben gegriffen und nach dem Ziehen wird das Schwert sogleich entschlossen nach unten gedrückt. Die Klinge des Angreifers wird abgefangen. Das Schwert schlägt von oben vergleichbar einer Tigerpranke zu.

Das ist eine Abwehr mit dem Klingenrücken (vergleiche die Kata Ukenagashi). Dann wird die Sache mit senkrechtem Schnitt abgeschlossen.

Inazuma

(Inazuma:: Blitz. Ein im Iaihiza Sitzender wird frontal angegriffen. Es wird vergleichbar mit der Seitei-Iai Kata Morotezuki während des Zurück­weichens schräg zum Kopf des Angreifers von links oben nach rechts unten gezogen. Alternativ auch in einen heran Stürmenden hinein.
Danach folgt gleich ein kräftiger beidhändiger Schnitt, um den Angreifer endgültig zu besiegen.

Ukigumo

(Uki-gumo: Schwebende Wolke. Der Iaidoka sitzt im Iaihiza. Er wird von einem rechts Sitzenden angegriffen, der zum Schwertgriff des Iaidokas greifen will. Dieser steht auf, zieht den Griff des Schwertes nach hinten, um diesen Versuch zu vereiteln. Dann schlägt er mit dem Griff zurück, rückt dem Angreifer nahe und zieht nach rechts seitwärts.
Mit beigelegter Hand (vergl. Soetezuki) wird das Schwert an den Angreifer angelegt und durch­ge­zogen. Danach folgt eine Drehung zum gefallenen Gegner am Boden und ein letzter Schnitt macht diesem ein Ende.
Diese Form verlangt hohe Körperbeherrschung und Kraft. Nur im aufgewärmten Zustand üben!

Yamaoroshi

(Yama-oroshi:: Bergwind. In der fünften Form greift der rechts sitzende Feind an. Er will mög­licher­weise den Schwertgriff des Iaidokas weg­reissen oder selbst sein Schwert ziehen.
Der Iaidoka kommt dem Angriff zuvor und schlägt seinen Schwertgriff auf die Arme oder Hände des (ziehenden) Gegners. Der Griff wird zum Stoß gegen den Kopf hoch gezogen. Er rückt an den Gegner heran, um ihn zu bedrängen und zieht das Schwert nach rechts aus.
Mit beigelegter Hand wird das Schwert an den Angreifer angelegt und durch­ge­zogen. Danach folgt eine Drehung zum gefallenen Gegner am Boden und ein letzter Schnitt macht allem ein Ende.

Iwanami

(Iwa-nami:: Welle am Fels. Nun verteidigt man sich gegen einen Angriff eines links sitzenden Gegners. Im Moment des Angriffs rückt der Iaidoka ausweichend nach hinten und zieht sein Katana. Mit abrupter 90° Körperwendung nach links umgreift und dreht er sein Schwert gleichzeitig. So kann er dann mit Soetezuki-Technik den Gegner stechen.
Mit beigelegter Hand wird das Schwert an den An­grei­fer angelegt und ab­ge­zo­gen. Danach folgt eine Drehung zum gefallenen Gegner am Boden und ein letzter Schnitt macht allem ein Ende.

Urokogaeshi

(Uroko-gaeshi:: Umgedrehte Fischschuppe. Nun verteidigt man sich gegen einen Angriff eines von links angreifenden Gegners. Im Moment des Angriffs zieht der Iaidoka seitlich ausweichend sein Katana. Mit enger 90° Körperwendung nach links geht sein Nukitsuke wie das Streichen gegen die schuppige Oberfläche eines Fisches (daher der eigenartige Name der Form). Diese Verteidigung wird von einem senkrechten beid­händigen Schnitt gefolgt, der die Sache zuende bringt.

Namigaeshi

(Nami-gaeshi:: Umschlagende Welle. Nun verteidigt man sich gegen einen Angriff eines von hinten angreifenden Gegners. Im Moment des Angriffs zieht der Iaidoka mit Körpertäuschung sein Katana. Die Körpertäuschung entspricht der Vorstellung einer Welle, die gegen einen Felsen brandet (daher der Name der Form) und dann zurückschlägt. Mit 180° Körperdrehung nach hinten trifft das waagerecht schneidende Nukitsuke. Diese Verteidigung wird von einem senkrechten beidhändigen Schnitt gefolgt, der die Sache zuende bringt.

Takiotoshi

(Takio-toshi:: Wasserfall. Nun verteidigt man sich gegen einen Angriff eines rückwärtig sitzenden Gegners. Er will das Saya ergreifen oder wird auf sonstige Weise aggressiv. In diesem Moment erhebt sich der Iaidoka mit drehender Bewegung und zieht das Schwert in die Vertikale hoch. Dann wird das Schwert bei 180° Körperdrehung blank gezogen und es erfolgt ein Stich von oben in den unteren Gegner hinein. Diese Verteidigung wird von einem senkrechten beidhändigen Schnitt gefolgt, der die Sache zuende bringt.

Nukiuchi

(Nuki-uchi: Ziehen und schlagen. Es sitzen sich zwei Schwertkämpfer im Seiza gegenüber. Der Gegner zieht. In fließender Bewegung zieht der Iaidoka sein Schwert und bewegt es zur Uke­na­ga­shi-Abwehr. Dann holt er weiter fließend zum senkrechtem Schnitt hoch aus. Beim Schnitt werden zum Ausgleich die Beine aus­ein­ander­gesetzt.

Okuden (Zagyo)0102030405060708

Hidden Level Muso Shinden Ryu

The twenty-one forms of Okuden Ryu represent the third learning stage of Muso Shinden Ryu. The forms are divided into sitting (Zagyo) and standing forms (Tachiwaza). There are partially different versions of the forms. Okuden is the hidden and formerly secret level. The true meanings of the forms (Bunkai) lies behind the situations and (alleged) descriptions and must be recognized by oneself. These are modifications of the technology, which can be reinterpreted down to the psychological level. There exist variations for each shape.

Note: practice this Iaido Kata only under the guidance of an experienced Iaido trainer! Okuden kata are only for advanced learners. The Katas seems simple, but can lead to accidents. The correct execution requires a lot of experience and an overview.

Kasumi

(Temple, literally: haze). In the first form the Iaidoka sits like in all Okuden forms in the Iaihiza. If he suspects the attack, he pulls the sword through to a horizontal cut, turns it and cuts in the opposite direction, then lifts it over the head for a two-handed vertical cut.

The Iaidoka moves forward after each cut until it finally reaches the opponent.

Sunegakoi

(Shin guard). The Iaidoka in Iaihiza. When he detects a threat from someone sitting in front of him, action is taken. He moves back and makes a deep one-handed defensive blow on the attacker’s sword.

This defense is followed by a vertical two-handed cut.

Shihogiri

(Cut in four directions). Again the Iaidoka is sitting in Iaihiza. When he detects a threat posed by four of him encircling people, action is taken. He turns back to the left, draws the sword while sitting up and stabs the opponent in the stomach.

This attack is followed by further two-handed vertical cuts. First, while sitting, the Iaidoka turns to the rear right opponent and cuts him. Then it goes to the left front and finally to the front right opponent.

Tozume

(Waiting at the door prepared for opponents). The Iaidoka waits sitting in Iaihiza. To the right of him is an entrance. An opponent comes through the entrance. The Iaidoka senses the beginning of an attack. The Iaidoka reacts by turning halfway to the right and drawing the sword at the same time.

He distributes an oblique (compare Morotetsuki) vertical cut in the attacker’s face, then immediately turns to the left to another opponent and makes a final, two-handed cut.

Towaki

(Next to the door). It’s almost the same situation as in the previous kata. In this form the enemy seated in front attacks. He is counterattacked with a one-handed horizontal stab.

A second enemy arrives and storms in at the entrance. The Iaidoka turns to him on the spot and makes a vertical two-handed cut to the attacker and advances.

Tanashita

(Under the house floor). The Iaidoka sits cowering under the floor (of a typical Japanese house) and is watching. If the opponent is nearby he moves forward from his shelter while drawing his sword in a stooped position and cuts him frontally.

When he has made it out of hiding, he raises the sword for a two-handed vertical cut.

Ryozume

(Narrowed at the side). Now you defend yourself against an attack by an opponent coming from the front. There is no space to the side for sweeping movement. The Iaidoka moves forward from the Iaihiza. He draws his sword in flowing motion and holds it in front of him with both hands (compare with Morotetsuki).

With an energetic advance and stretching forward, he stabs the opponent.

Torabashiri

(Tiger walk). Now you defend yourself against the threat of an opponent blocking the front. There is no space to the side for sweeping movement. The Iaidoka moves forward out of the Iaihiza and creeps up in quiet steps and in a crouched position. He draws his sword in flowing motion and cuts then.

He is attacked again on the retreat motion in a crouched position. However, the opponent will run into the quickly drawn blade.

Okuden (Tachiwaza)09101112131415161718192021

Hidden Level Muso Shinden Ryu

The standing forms (Tachiwaza) are no less demanding than the sitting forms. Rhythm, understanding and balance are essential.

Again: practice this Iaido Kata only under the guidance of an experienced Iaido trainer! Okuden kata are only for advanced learners. The Katas seems simple, but can lead to accidents. The correct execution requires a lot of experience and an overview.

Yukitsure

(Von zwei Personen begleitet). In dieser ersten stehenden Form gehen vor dem Iaidoka zwei Personen. Die erste Person rechts wendet sich um in der Absicht, anzugreifen. Der Kämpfer weicht mit einem Shuffle zurück, zieht und schneidet den Angreifer. Mit Schritt vor erledigt er folgend die linke Person mit geradem Schnitt.

Rentatsu

(Zusammen losgehen). In einer der ersten Kata ähnlichen Weise gehen vor dem Iaidoka zwei Personen. Die erste Person links wendet sich um in der Absicht, anzugreifen. Oder in anderer Interpretation lässt sich der Iaidoka etwas aus einer 3er-Gruppe zurückfallen. Der Kämpfer weicht mit einem Shuffle zurück, zieht und sticht den Angreifer. Mit Schritt vor erledigt er folgend die rechte Person mit geradem Schnitt.

Somakuri

(Alles zusammen). Im Gehen kommt der Iaidoka auf einen Gegner zu. Mit einer Täuschung zieht er leicht das Schwert vor, geht aber rückwärts in Ukenagashi-Abwehr. Im Kontern schneidet er vorwärtsgehend in Ayumi Ashi (Wechselschritt) den Gegner rechts mit Schnitt von der Schläfe bis zum Kinn, dann links mit einem Schnitt von Schulter bis ins Zentrum, dann wiederum rechts vom Unterarm bis zum Zentrum, dann anschließend mit Horizontalschnitt von links nach rechts durch die Hüfte und zuguterletzt beendet ein senkrechter Überkopfschnitt das Ganze.

Sodome

(Alles anhalten). Der Iaidoka geht eine Treppe hinunter. Ein Gegner greift von unten an. Mit bis zu fünfmaligen Ziehen und Noto in Folge treibt man den Gegner nach unten, bis dieser besiegt wird.

Shinobu

(Ganz leise). Im Dunkeln oder im Nebel wird ein Gegner in Front vermutet oder bemerkt. Leise pirscht man voran, zieht sein Schwert und tippt vor/hinter dem Gegner auf dem Boden. Dieser stürmt auf den vermeintlichen Gegner zu. Da man vor dem Tippen seitwärts geht, lässt sich in diesem Moment aus guter Stellung der Gegner überlegen besiegen.

Yukichigai

(Gehend verfehlt). Zwei Gegner wollen angreifen. Mit Ganmenate versucht man den Angriff des ersten Gegners zu unterlaufen. Der Gegner geht links herum. Das Schwert wird in der Wendung gezogen zum beidhändigen Schnitt nach hinten; danach kommt es mit Fortführung der Drehung zum zweiten Gegner und einem abschließenden Schnitt.

Sodesurigaeshi

(Wehende Ärmel umdrehen). Man steht in Deckung hinter einer Menschenmenge, der Gegner davor. Man drückt sich nach dem Ziehen des Schwertes mit der Waffe in der Hand durch die Menge hindurch und holt weit zum Schnitt aus. Weil man auf den Gegner zuläuft, schlagen aufgrund der Bewegung nun die (langen) Ärmel um.

Moniri

(In den Eingang gehen). In einem Eingang versperrt ein Gegner den Weg. Im Wegdrehen zieht der Iaidoka seitlich sein Schwert. Dann erfolgt ein einhändiger Stich in den Bauch des blockierenden Gegners im Zugang. Ein hinten befindlicher weiterer Feind wird geschnitten. Aus dem Eingang ist ein dritter Gegner aufgetaucht. Er wird ebenfalls geschnitten.

Kabezoi

(An der Wand entlang). Eng an einer Wand oder zwischen Wänden stehend wartet der Iaidoka. Plötzlich greift ein Gegner von vorne an. Das Schwert wird so eng am Körper wie möglich gezogen und mit Schritt vorwärts erfolgt ein senkrechter Schnitt.

Ukenagashi

(Feind abwehren). Zwei Schwertträger kommen aufeinander zu. Der Angreifer zieht das Schwert. In einem pendelnden Ausweichen nach rechts wird das Schwert steil nach oben gezogen zur Ukenagashi-Abwehr. Im Stehen und seitwärts vom Gegner wird zum Schnitt gegen den Angreifer durchgezogen.

Oikakegiri

(Verfolgung und Schnitt). In Entfernung steht ein Gegner, auf den der Iaidoka zukommt. Er ergreift die Initiative, indem er sich unbemerkt nähert, im richtigen Moment das Schwert zieht und mit Seme auf den Gegner eindringt. Mit vorwärtstreibenden Ashi-Sabaki (Fußarbeit) bedrängt er den Gegner soweit, dass er einen abschließenden Schnitt machen kann.

Ryoshihikitsure

(Von zwei Samurais begleitet sein). Im Gehen befinden sich 2 Gegner links des Iaidokas. Im Ziehen (Nukitsuke) schneidet der Iaidoka durch die Flanke des ersten Gegners, schwingt das Schwert durch und setzt dem zweiten flüchtenden Gegner nach. Dieser wird mit abschließenden Kirioroshi besiegt.

Itomagoi

(Abschied nehmen). Zwei Samurai sitzen sich gegenüber im Seiza. Die Schwerter stecken im Gürtel. Dann verneigen sich beide zum Grüßen. In der Beuge zieht der Iaidoka sein Schwert hoch über den Kopf und schlägt den Gegner mit einen senkrechtem Schnitt.